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When Men Leave: Part 2

July 24, 2014

jennybadman

If you’re just starting this reading adventure, start with part one. Here’s part two:

My father, Glenn, left us when I was seven and Scout was just two. I don’t remember seeing him much, because he worked nights fixing cars over in Montgomery. I remember sometimes he used to come and sit at the edge of my bed when he came home from work. I always woke up because even in my sleep I could smell the mix of gasoline and metal on his jacket. I’d open my eyes, and he’d be sitting there in the dark patting my back or playing with my hair. For years when I was little I thought Glenn was just a dream, not even real.

“Hey,” I’d say.

“Hey yourself,” he’d whisper.

“Lemme see your hands,” I always demanded.

He’d give me one of his enormous hands, and I’d sit up and look at it. It was always rough and scratchy and even in the dark I could make out the oil and dirt under his short nails. I’d run my hands over the lines of his palm and try to memorize them while he pulled a Camel from his shirt and lit up with the other hand.

“That dirt won’t ever come off all the way, will it?” I asked every night.

“Nope,” he said easily. “It’s here to stay. Now, roll over, rugrat, and get you some more sleep.”

I’d let go of his hand, and he’d pat my back until I fell back asleep.

The only time I remember seeing him in the daytime was when Scout tripped and her head on the corner of the coffee table and cracked her head open. I remember Mom being so calm as she scooped Scout up off the floor screaming and gushing blood from her forehead. I thought Scout was dying, and I started bawling.

“Sara,” Mom said firmly. “She’s gonna be fine. Now run and call Glenn and tell him to meet us at the emergency room.”

When Glenn got to the emergency room, I was sitting in a beige plastic chair swinging my feet and biting my fingernails. Mom was behind a yellow curtain with Scout and the doctor. They were giving Scout 10 stitches, and she howled and sobbed like they were killing her. Glenn walked up to where I was sitting and I looked up, surprised to see him suddenly there. His curly brown hair was wild and windblown, and the skin above his green eyes was pinched and tense. He looked scared and pale.

“Where’s the baby?”

“Behind the curtain with Mom. They’re giving her stitches. That’s her crying,” I said, my voice breaking.

He sat down next to me and pulled me onto his lap. I leaned against him, exhausted, and started tracing the red cursive letters on his jacket. G, L, E, N, N, over and over.

“You girls…” he said softly into my hair. “Sometimes I can’t hardly take it.”

***

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6 Comments

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  1. July 24, 2014

    What a beautiful write…touched my heart with this one.

  2. July 24, 2014

    Stupendous. Amazing tale, full of heart, and longing and character. The sense of place in the rhythm of the words and the syntax is perfect.

    • July 24, 2014

      Holy moly, Cheryl, thank you! That means so much coming from you!

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