Gallery

High Cotton gets fresh

Been working with pals at Blue Ion on some fantastically fun projects for Maverick Southern Kitchens, the passionate folks behind High Cotton, Slight North of Broad, Old Village Post House, Charleston Cooks, High Hammock and High Cotton Greenville. Our goal for all the projects is simple: share the goodness that’s inherent: the amazing food, talented staff and warm hospitality. Check out an upcoming print ad we produced. Props and thanks to Woody, Josh, Nicola and Robert.

For CoJo

CoJo, Jake & Aaron

Tomorrow a dear, sweet friend of mine leaves Charleston to its own humid devices to venture north to the land of clams, patriots and red sox. Yes friends, BOSTON.

I’ve known Courtney Jo for nearly three years now, and in that short expanse of time (a blink, really), she has become an indispensable part of my life. Might I add we have both packed in the life experiences over the course of these three years, to include:

  • Job strife
  • Job hilarity
  • Creative inspiration
  • Creative disillusionment
  • Personal empowerment
  • Job loss
  • Job find(s)
  • Death
  • Birth
  • Break ups
  • Back togethers
  • New relationships
  • Laughter
  • Tears (of all varieties)
  • Food & drink (of all varieties)

Through it all, I have come to adore this woman’s face, her easy laughter and tears, her hugs, greeting cards, rides to the airport and support and encouragement beyond measure. CoJo is the little sister I never knew I wanted (I’m the youngest in my family). She’s the friend you can call at 3 a.m., and she will show up. CoJo, I am a better girl/friend/writer/person, because of you. Thank you. Safe travels, my bear!

P.S. Don’t worry, we’ve already planned our fall festival road trip/beer fest/apple picking bonanza trip to Boston.

P.P.S. If you start talking with a Boston accent, I will totally break up with you. LOVE!

Yarborough Applegate: sleeves rolled up

Find help here.

Friends at Blue Ion just launched a site for two Charleston attorneys and their new firm, Yarborough Applegate. I had the opportunity to meet with William and David as I worked on copy for their site. Both are Charleston natives. In fact, they’ve been friends since childhood. And, both worked for big Charleston firms, William at Motley Rice and David at Pierce, Herns, Sloan & McLeod before deciding to break out on their own.

When I sat down with them, I was struck by their intelligence and intensity. Though their passion for what they do manifests differently in each of them, there’s simply no question that these guys mean what they say. Which, as lawyers go, is more than refreshing.

I think it’s that feeling that informed Blue Ion’s Creative Director David Wood and his talented wife Shannon to craft an identity and design for Yarborough Applegate that sets them apart. Many thanks to the entire Blue Ion team, especially Mike, Brian and Chris, who helped me craft copy that search engines will just love.

Here’s a bit of copy I wrote for the site:

Tireless And Tenacious

We Do This Work Because This Is Your Life.
Not Just Our Case.

We think you have a right to live your life to the fullest potential. If something happens to get in the way of that, we’re there. We are driven and determined in pursuit of a remedy for your loss. When it comes to your life, there’s simply no other way we can be.

Snowy evening in Charleston

This Jersey girl spent Friday night watching it snow, YES, snow in Charleston. The first accumulative snow the Holy City has seen since 1989. I watched what began as cold rain turn into sleet. I sat outside listening to the sleet as it ricocheted lightly off of windows, cars and trees, waiting. When the sleet began changing into snow, I sat motionless, wondering how long it could last.

When it became clear that the snow meant business, I walked inside and spent the evening on the couch in front of my picture window. For hours I watched the snow in wonder and disbelief. Watching snow cover palm fronds is quite a sight to see.

I’ve been away from New Jersey winters long enough to forget the absolute hush that comes over the world when it snows. Though I’m not sure how long the quiet lasted, I know it’s a memory now burned in my brain, like the smell of my Dad’s bread baking.

The silence finally broke to sounds of joy: shrieks of delight and amazement from neighbors young and old, loud laughter and shouts from friends gathering great handfuls of snow for snowball fights.

As I looked to the streetlights to see the snow, I remembered dozens of nights from my childhood where I strained to see snowflakes in a beam of light, promising the universe whatever it wanted as long as I could have a snow day. PLEASE!

Funny how two inches of Southern snow can take a girl all the way back home.